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4 Tips for Helping Increase Focus in Your Students

by Sarah Major

Focus & Learning:

I grew up in a time when we were supposed to sit in our desks and face forward and pay attention, so when I started to teach, I arranged my desks in rows, and expected my well behaved students to sit, face forward, and pay attention.

One of my first graders taught me that while this arrangement might be convenient for the teacher, it was not workable for him. My new first grade class was a real challenge - lots of learning issues, behavior issues, and more.

Help! My Child has Behavior Issues

by Sarah Major

Behavior issues in the classroom can be so difficult to deal with. Sometimes children act out, disrupt class, fight, act tough, refuse to cooperate in class, refuse to do their work – and more. At times, it seems that children do things that, from our point of view, makes life harder for them!

WHAT IS BEHIND MANY OF THESE BEHAVIORS

Why School Can Be Hard for a Right-Brained Learner

by Sarah Major

If it is true that the majority of the children struggling in our schools are right-brained learners, it is critical to understand what exactly is hard for these students so we can eliminate the things from our teaching.

The Roles of Emotion in Learning

by Sarah Major

Too often adults behave as though we (subconsciously, not intentionally) believe that all learning happens in the thinking, rational brain, and that if a child is not performing well with reading or math, their rational, thinking brain is somehow at fault, i.e. disabled.

Why it's so Important to Know What Kind of Learner Your Child is

by Sarah Major

We parents can have a pretty linear view of our children’s ability to perform well in school. We tend to speak about children as “smart,” “struggling,” or “learning disabled.” The problem with this view of children’s scholastic ability is that there is room for a whole lot of error in mis-labeling children and when we have subconsciously determined what group a child falls into, it might not occur to us to make the effort to find out what exactly is causing a lack of success.

Discovering your Child's Giftedness

by Sarah Major

The term “learning style” has been so widely used that honestly it is hard to know what the term means anymore. I winced each time I used “learning style” when writing the past four blogs about learning profiles (Concrete Sequential, Abstract Sequential, Abstract Random and Concrete Random).

How to Design Units that Access each Student's Giftedness

…AND TURN ON THEIR EXCITEMENT FOR LEARNING

It would be amazing to take a protracted field trip and visit the schools across the nation, walk the hallways, and peek in the classroom doors to see what we can see. Doubtless what we would witness would be incredibly varied. We would see everything from classrooms in which students are engaged, participating, and energized, to classrooms in which children are passive, indifferent, and checked out. In some of these latter classrooms, behaviors are out of control, while in others, students are silent.

Four Ways to Encourage Creativity in Your Child’s Play

by Jan Pierce                       

What word comes to mind when you think of your child at play?

Did you say “toys?”

If you did, your answer is very common in today’s market-driven world.

Perhaps a better way, however, to think of play is through the word activity. What will your child do as he plays? What will your child say as she pretends?

The Role of Emotion in Learning

by Sarah Major

Too often adults behave as though we (subconsciously, not intentionally) believe that all learning happens in the thinking, rational brain,
and that if a child is not performing well with reading or math, their rational, thinking brain is somehow at fault, i.e. disabled.

Tips for Teaching Your Children To Focus

by Kyla Stelling

Today’s technologically advanced world is fast-moving and reliant on instant gratification. This is a detrimental cultural trait for your child to inherit, as it will stifle their ability to focus, engage in critical thinking and be creative. Your child may frequently stray from their homeschool work due to distractions. Be aware of this behavioral pattern, as it can become a habit that negatively affects their academic aptitude and long-term success.